THEME

thedarknessinthelight0987:

jimmy-carrs-laugh:

best thing iv seen on tumblr

Stay Strong

comedycentral:

Click here for more of Jon Stewart’s coverage of the recent House Committee on Science, Space and Technology hearing.

creaseintime:

are you ready to get

creaseintime:

are you ready to get

creaseintime:

SPOOKY

creaseintime:

SPOOKY

frigginjabroni:

Went from comedic to real as fuck in like 2 seconds

lifeimagines:

Remember that time

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

Sam Smith  Stay With Me

radtracks:

stay with me // sam smith

oh, won’t you stay with me?
'cause you're all i need
this ain’t love, it’s clear to see
but, darling, stay with me

cliffordscat:

when your technologically challenged friend is using the computer

image

PNC Music Pavilion - Charlotte, NC
frenchfryaccordion:

evienator:

octoberrainfall252:

Not taking any chances

I scrolled past this and the guilt was too much

cant afford to tae this chance. literally i cant afford to fail these classes and have to take them over again…

frenchfryaccordion:

evienator:

octoberrainfall252:

Not taking any chances

I scrolled past this and the guilt was too much

cant afford to tae this chance. literally i cant afford to fail these classes and have to take them over again…

morgaanann:

Can we please just admire these kickass photos my best friend took at Yellowstone

  #I WENT TO YELLOWSTONE OVER THE SUMMER AND IT WAS SDO PRETTY  

mhyin-mahar:

So I was watching A Scooby-Doo! Halloween when…

jennacolaman:

SAM PEPPERS VIDEO IS OFFICIALLY OFF YOUTUBE!
AND HIS CHANNEL IS SUSPENDED!

jennacolaman:

SAM PEPPERS VIDEO IS OFFICIALLY OFF YOUTUBE!

AND HIS CHANNEL IS SUSPENDED!

kosmological:

phandoms-united:

art-sex-drugs:

I have finally hit my breaking point. For as long as I can remember I have endured my mother’s abuse, whether it is verbal, emotional, or as seen here physical. I can expect some act of violence on a daily basis, and her beating me is not an usual occurrence, but today something snapped. My mother did this unprovoked, and this time she didn’t stop. Usually it’s bad for a little while and then she’s done, today it went on for what seemed like forever. At a certain point I decided I was going to do something I never do, call the police. You see, my mother is a highly respected and very well known person where I live. She is on the board of ed, worked for CPS for many years, and is close personal friends with people like the local chief of police, director of our local CPS unit, and so on. I always knew that calling wouldn’t go anywhere and just upset her more, but today I had to try. While she was kicking me I found my opportunity, and somehow managed to get away from someone more than twice my size. I ran as fast as I could, knocking things over behind my, trying to find a phone. I dialed and they listened and my mother proceeding to beat me over it, while I screamed for help. For the second time today, I managed to get away from her and ran to my room. I barely had enough time to lock my door, before she starting trying to get it, to the point that she ripped my door off the frame. I decided I was going to stay locked in there, until the police came. The past few months I have been collecting evidence against her, voice recordings, pictures like these, and videos of her violence, so they couldn’t dispute what was going on. But I was dead wrong. 

When the officer finally came up to my room, I attempted to tell him my side of the story, but before I could get a sentence out he silenced me. HE told me that this was my mothers house, and I needed to live by her rules. If I didn’t she had the right to punish me. He also told me to be tankful for her, because he wanted to press assault charges against me. finally, he refused, despite my begging, for him to take me to a shelter for teens. 

I am utterly disgusted by the injustice that occurred today. I pray there is no one else out there who is living in such a situation. I am not sure exactly what I am getting out of writing this, except maybe that it’s just nice to be able to open up about this, when I have had to keep it a secret my whole life. idk. sorry for posting such heavy shit. 

Signal boost the fuck out of this

Firstly, thank you to everyone who has cared or been affected by my post. The overwhelming support that has poured in is truly remarkable. Over the past 24 hours I have received upwards of 1500 messages, asking about when this was, how I am doing now, and how can they help. To begin, this post was made way back in June after I was so disgusted with the way that the police treated me, they downright victim blaming, and I wanted it to be heard. It originally got about 100 notes and I was satisfied knowing that my feelings were validated. When I woke up yesterday morning I found that it had grown to about 4000 notes, overnight, and continued to amplify over the past two days.

In hopes of putting some of your worries to rest, I am no longer living in my mother’s house. It was a long summer, while I essentially exhausted every legal option I had to get out. CPS started an investigation that went nowhere, I tried to find another family member or friend that would take me in but it didn’t pan out, and even attempted to get myself emancipated, but without having a steady income it didn’t end well. Then almost two weeks ago, my mother caught onto what I was trying to do, and while I was away for the weekend, texted me telling me not to come back. She made it so that I couldn’t collect my belongings, and only had a backpack full of things in my possession. Currently I am staying with family until I have the means to get a place of my own, and trying to get myself enrolled into a local school, so that I can finish out my senior year.

I made this post somewhat naively, never thinking of the impact it could have. So when, so many of you have gone to my inbox sharing your own stories of hardship (and I encourage more of you too do so), it gave my perspective on how big this post became. Seeing the influence I have right now, I want use it to enact some change. The tumblr community is infamous for discussing change, but not acting upon it. Many of you have voiced strong opinions and a great desire to help. After thinking this over (and my that I mean coming up with hastily this last night) , I decided to startup a paypal account as means to donate to charities that work to end child and domestic abuse.

The donations, as they are received, will go into a PayPal account I set up. The following is what I plan to do with the money donated:

            -The first 300 donated will go towards necessities (As previously stated: I was kicked out, and am in need of some basics)

            -After 300 is reached, 90% of every donation thereafter will go to Joyful Heart Foundation

- The other 10% will go into a saving account for my college endeavors. (I am basically on my own to pay for it, and can only legally work part time) 

Not trying to offend anyone, but it is my understanding that if gif’s from a tv show, and photographs of Starbucks’s coffee cups can get millions of notes, why can’t an attempt to make a difference regarding something so horrible and yet far too common (3.6 reported cases in the U.S. each year). Please support me in taking this issue out of the dark, as well as helping those who have suffered. Even if you think that you have nothing to give, as little as a dollar can make a difference (it adds up!), and more importantly your spreading awareness about a worthy cause. 

Click here to donate!